Making Azure PowerShell Scripts Work in PowerShell and As RunBooks

Published On: 2016-08-17By:

Runbooks are very powerful tools which allow you to automate PowerShell commands which need to be run at different times.  One of the problems that I’ve run across when dealing with Azure Runbooks is that there is no way to use the same script on prem during testing and the same script when deploying. This is because of the way that authentication has to be handled when setting up a runbook.

The best way to handle authentication within a runbook is to store the authentication within the Azure Automation configuration as a stored credential.  The problem here is that you can’t use this credential while developing your runbook in the normal Powershell ISE.

One option which I’ve come up with is a little bit of TRY/CATCH logic that you can put into the PowerShell Script, which you’ll find below.

In this sample code we use a variable named $cred to pass authentication to the add-AzureRmAccount (and the add-AzureAccount) cmdlet. If that variable has no value in it then we try get call get-AutomationPSCredential. If the script is being run within the Azure Runbook environment then this will succeed and we’ll get a credential into the $cred variable. If not the call will fail, and the runner will be prompted for their Azure credentials through an PowerShell dialog box box. Whatever credentials are entered are saved into the $cred variable.

When we get to the add-AzureRmAccount and/or the add-AzureAccount cmdlets we pass in the value from $cred into the -Credential input parameter.

The reason that I’ve wrapped the get-AutomationPSCredential cmdlet in the IF block that I have, is so that it can be run over and over again in PowerShell without having to ask you to authenticate over and over again. I left the calls for the add-AzureRmAccount and add-AzureAccount inside the IF block so that it would only be called on the first run as there’s no point is calling add-AzureRmAccount every time unless we are authenticating for the first time.

if (!$cred) {
try {
[PSCredential] $cred = Get-AutomationPSCredential -Name $AzureAccount
}
catch {
write-warning ("Unable to get runbook account. Authenticate Manaually")
[PSCredential] $cred = Get-Credential -Message "Enter Azure Portal Creds"

if (!$cred) {
write-warning "Credentials were not provided. Exiting." -ForegroundColor Yellow
return
}
}

try {
add-AzureRmAccount -Credential $cred -InformationVariable InfoVar -ErrorVariable ErrorVar
}
catch {
Clear-Variable cred
write-warning ("Unable to authenticate to AzureRM using the provided credentials")
write-warning($ErrorVar)
return
}

try {
add-AzureAccount -Credential $cred -InformationVariable InfoVar -ErrorVariable ErrorVar
}
catch {
Clear-Variable cred
write-warning ("Unable to authenticate to AzureSM using the provided credentials")
write-warning( $ErrorVar)
return
}
}

You’ll be seeing this coming up shortly as part of a large PowerShell script that I’ll be releasing on Git-Hub to make live easier for some of us in Azure.

Denny

The post Making Azure PowerShell Scripts Work in PowerShell and As RunBooks appeared first on SQL Server with Mr. Denny.

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