William Ryan Homes Azure Migration

Published On: 2019-03-14By:

The Client:

Home Being Built
Founded in 1992, William Ryan Homes is the award-winning home builder of more than 10,000 new homes across the United States.
IT Support Coordinator Peter Guzman has been with the company for six years.

The Challenge:

When employees and clients of William Ryan Homes started complaining about slow applications, Peter Guzman knew it was time to go to the cloud.

“Our contractors couldn’t see what their next task was on the schedule, so they couldn’t move things around to reschedule vendors in accordance with construction. Everything was SLOW,” Peter explains.

The on-premise server critical to ERP/ERM was on its last legs and their SQL Server software was out of support. The fiscally prudent choice was to migrate to the cloud to spare the company major capital expenditures. But as the lone IT support coordinator for the whole company, Peter couldn’t manage a migration in addition to production needs. He needed an expert capable of doing the migration seamlessly and the consultant had to be willing to work around the company’s multiple time zones of production. He turned to an expert he trusted in the IT community, who gave him two names. Peter called them both.
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Webcast: Power BI: Where Should My Data Live?

Published On: 2019-03-11By:

At 11 am Pacific /2 pm Eastern on April 5th, 2019 DCAC will proudly be presenting the webcast “Power BI: Where Should My Data Live?” which is being presented by our own Meagan Longoria and Kerry Tyler.

Power BI provides many options for acquiring and creating datasets. Do you know the difference between an Imported Model, a Live Connection, and DirectQuery? Have you tried Composite Models? Are you aware of the newest features related to Power BI Dataflows and XMLA endpoints? This webcast will review your options for where to store data and explain the factors that should be used in determining what option is right for you. Obvious requirements such as data size, license costs and management, and desired data latency will be discussed. We’ll also talk about other factors such as the desire for self-service BI and avoiding data model sprawl. Join us for this webcast to learn how to determine the most appropriate type of Power BI dataset for your use case.

Click through and sign up for the webcast today. You’ll be able to download a calendar entry to remind yourself about the webcast. See you on April 5th.

If you register for the webcast and you can’t make it, fear not the session will be recorded and available for viewing after the fact as well.

Denny

 

The post Webcast: Power BI: Where Should My Data Live? appeared first on SQL Server with Mr. Denny.

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Recovering SQL Server Databases from a Failed SAN Drive

Published On: 2019-03-05By:

I was recently cleaning the house when I got a phone call from a client that I hadn’t heard from in a while.  Their SAN had decided that it was going to corrupt one of the LUNs. This LUN happened to be the Log drive on one of their SQL Servers.

Needless to say, SQL was down.

We created the LUN, and created the folders on the drive, and started SQL.  All the databases on the server showed “Recovery Pending” as their state in Management Studio.

Manually bringing the databases online wasn’t going to work as that caused error 5181 which reads:

Could not restart database MyDatabase. Reverting to the previous status.

Apparently, that wasn’t going to work. I was going to need a bigger hammer, in this case, a much bigger hammer. That bigger hammer was emergency mode and checkdb.

The users would be back on the system in about 8 hours, and the users, in this case, were lawyers, some of who might need to be in court in the morning, and the system was down wasn’t an excuse that was going to fly in front of a judge.

Since I had 169 databases to bring online, a script would be needed to handle this.  That script was pretty rough, but it got the job done.  Thankfully no users would be using the database, so there “should” be no transactions that were in processes. We wouldn’t be able to recover them anyway.

declare @name varchar(max)
declare @sql varchar(max)
declare cur CURSOR for select name from sys.databases where state = 3
open cur
fetch next from cur into @name
while @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
begin
set @sql = 'alter database ' + @name + ' set emergency, single_user
dbcc checkdb (''' + @name + ''', repair_allow_data_loss)
alter database ' + @name + ' set online, multi_user'
exec (@sql)
fetch next from cur into @name
end
close cur
deallocate cur

The script ran, all the databases came online (it took a while to run, the databases on the server are about 9 TB in size) and all was well.

Denny

The post Recovering SQL Server Databases from a Failed SAN Drive appeared first on SQL Server with Mr. Denny.

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Employers shouldn’t be selling employee data

Published On: 2019-02-25By:

Employers and employees have by their nature a very trusting relationship. The employee trusts that the company will keep paying them, and the employer trusts that the employee will do the job that they are being asked to do.  The employee also trusts that the employer will act professionally. This trust includes NOT selling the employees personal data to the highest bidder (or any bidder for that matter). Companies out there do this to their employees, and they shouldn’t be doing it. The small amount of revenue is not going to offset the loss of trust that employees have in the company they work for.

Selling customer data is a horrible enough practice, but companies can stand behind their EULA which probably says something about the person using the service is the product to be sold, and the actual customer is the company that is buying data (you didn’t think Facebook wasn’t selling every bit of data they gather?). Selling employee data is a whole-nother mess to deal with as employees are going to have no way to opt out of it, and no way to stop it. Even leaving the company isn’t going to help, because once the data has been sold, it’s gone, and you have no idea what the purchasing company will be doing with it (here’s a hint, they’re probably going to sell it).

If you’re someone who’s in a position to approve or deny these sorts of sales of employee data, the answer is “no” — every time, with no exception. Your employee data shouldn’t be for sale, and I’m guessing that your employee base is going to be some pretty low-value data to purchasers, as once people find out how/why the purchasing company got their data, I’m guessing the people won’t be purchasing anything any time soon.

Denny

 

The post Employer’s shouldn’t be selling employee data appeared first on SQL Server with Mr. Denny.

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