Don’t Forget About DR for Your DR

Here’s a scenario:

Let’s say you’re a small- or medium-sized company with either an on-premises data center in your office/building or in a “regular” co-lo nearby in the same metro area. You’ve got a mission-critical online presence, so in order to handle either a large-scale disaster for your geographic area or one just in your server room, you’ve written, implemented, and tested a disaster-recovery plan. Another co-lo a couple of states over is set up to be able to step in if needed, and this process can even be completed by non-technical resources in a couple of hours.Need a Plan C

This is a fairly-sound plan. However, what’s Step 2 after Something Bad™ happens to the primary data center and everything fails over to the DR site? What if Something Bad™ is long-term? You’re back to square one, with a single data center. Or where do you put the quorum file share for your AG?

Or, another situation: What if something happens to your DR site? Then what?

Almost Been There, Done That

One of our clients–who has a really good DR plan similar to the one described above–had a brush with this scenario earlier in the year. Their DR data center is in the Houston area, and in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, there were some concerns about the status of the DC. The DC itself was fine, but key support personnel would not have been able to get to the site for a number of days if there were such a need.

This situation did a good job of spurning conversations centered around what to do in this situation and what Plan C might look like.

Now What?

The point of this post is mostly to get you thinking about this scenario. Getting DR in place can be enough of a battle itself (I know), but ensuring that what happens next after a potential disaster is considered and planned for is another important step.

What this plan may look like is likely dependent upon what the “first stage” DR plan looks like. Not everyone can afford an additional site, especially if it’s a smaller company. And, let’s be honest: we could sit here all day and what-if burning data centers, but at some point, the return on this investment will become very questionable.

Although this looks/smells like a shameless plug for cloud/Azure, the public cloud is an excellent option to consider here. Even if your company is 100% on-premises with a classic hardware/virtualization platform, keeping a copy of critical systems’ backups up-to-date and available in the cloud is relatively inexpensive.  This “cold DR” process is a very easy-to-implement step to safeguard against a multi-phase or long-term disaster. In the event that these backups are needed, there’s the option of spinning up a group of VMs in the cloud to restore to. At the very least, this cold backup solution will be more-accessible than your current offsite backups if new on-prem servers are stood up somewhere to get the lights back on.

Contact the Author | Contact DCAC

“The Tuesday Night Fire Code Violation”

It was July 19, 2005. At least, I’m pretty sure it was.

Based on IndyPASS’s meeting history, that second meeting way down at the bottom (use your keyboard’s End key; that’s what it’s there for) was basically a “here’s what’s new/awesome in SQL Server 2005” presentation. I’ve long since lost most of my email from that time, but that meeting makes sense in the timeline of 2005’s release.

During the dark, dark days of 2005, just about everyone was desperate for an upgrade to SQL 2000. I was, and I hadn’t even been here that long. The fledgling Indianapolis PASS chapter met in a good-sized conference room on the ground floor of a Duke-owned office building off Meridian St (“twelve o’clock on the I-465 dial”) on the north side of town. That night, there were probably half-again as many people in that room as it could comfortably hold. People standing, sitting on the floor, you name it. Tom Pizzato, the speaker, was introduced; he walked up to the podium and the first thing he said was, “Welcome to the Tuesday night fire code violation.” That is still the best one-liner to open a technical presentation I’ve ever seen, and ever since, it has been cemented to SQL Server 2005 itself in my brain.

That was a long time ago–It’ll be eleven years here in a couple months. Eleven years is an appreciable percentage of an eternity in the tech world. As a result, earlier this week, Extended Support for SQL 2005 ended. This means that you, if you are still running it anywhere, will get no help from Microsoft were something to go wrong. Perhaps more importantly, there will be no more security patches made available for it. Don’t expect if something big happens, there will be a replay of what Microsoft did for XP.

This is a pretty big deal. If you have any kind of problem that you can’t fix, and you call Microsoft Support about it, you won’t get any help for your in-place system. You will have to upgrade to a supported version before you’ll be able to get any assistance, and in the middle of a problem bad enough to call PSS probably is not the time you want to be doing a Cowboy Upgrade™ of your production database system.

I understand that there are plenty of industries and even some specific companies that are either forced to, or elect to continue to run out-of-support RDBMSes on their mission-critical systems. I supported SQL 2000 for far longer than I would like to admit, and it was a risky proposition. After I transitioned out of that role, there was a restoration problem (fortunately on a non-production system) that it sure would have been nice to be able to call Microsoft about, but that wasn’t an option.

Don’t put yourself in that situation. There are plenty of points that can be made to convince the powers that be to upgrade. The fact that any new security vulnerability will not be addressed/patched should be a pretty good one for most companies. If you have an in-house network security staff, loop them in on the situation; I bet they will be happy to help you make your case.

One final note: If you are still running 2005 and are looking to upgrade, don’t just hop up to 2008 or 2012–go all the way to 2014 (or, once it goes Gold, 2016). SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 are scheduled to go off Extended Support on July 9, 2019. Three years seems like a long way off now, but that’ll sneak up on you…just like April 12, 2016 might have.

Contact the Author | Contact DCAC

Video

Globally Recognized Expertise

As Microsoft MVP’s and Partners as well as VMware experts, we are summoned by companies all over the world to fine-tune and problem-solve the most difficult architecture, infrastructure and network challenges.

And sometimes we’re asked to share what we did, at events like Microsoft’s PASS Summit 2015.

Awards & Certifications

Microsoft Partner   Denny Cherry & Associates Consulting LLC BBB Business Review    Microsoft MVP    Microsoft Certified Master VMWare vExpert
INC 5000 Award for 2020    American Business Awards People's Choice    American Business Awards Gold Award    American Business Awards Silver Award    FT Americas’ Fastest Growing Companies 2020   
Best Full-Service Cloud Technology Consulting Company       Insights Sccess Award    Technology Headlines Award    Golden Bridge Gold Award    CIO Review Top 20 Azure Solutions Providers